Saturday, March 25, 2017

Grand Canyon - South Rim

South Kaibab Trail head
At the top of the South Kaibab Trail, in the frigid morning air, I passed a woman who seemed petrified. The upper canyon was shrouded in snow, and ice coated the first mile or so. Even though I was wearing stablicers, I still went slow.

Beyond the ice, the trail looked like this.
Fabulous vistas changed at every switchback. I was thrilled to spot the river, then the bridge across. I shot my fist in the air when we entered the tunnel before the bridge--it was level the rest of the way.


This area had a steep drop-off, so I hugged the rock wall and gave the mules the precipitous edge.
Despite seven miles of downhill, I didn't get a single blister. Not one. In the past, my feet have killed me hiking down Mount Washington, so the downhill was my biggest concern. I made three changes to my footwear: new boots with a wide toe box, Injinji liner toe socks, and boots tied for downhill hiking. I also wore these cushy socks that my friend gave me. They were wonderfully soft.
Lunch with a view of the river. Phantom Ranch is on the right.
Phantom Ranch was nestled under an oasis of trees across the Colorado River. I was lucky to get a reservation at one of the few cabins at the ranch. One couple had brought their baby all the way down to the bottom of the canyon. The young woman planned to carry her 16-pound bundle uphill, and that pack wasn't going to get any lighter.
Across the river, the trail goes left to the ranch.

I wore shorts on the 10-mile uphill hike. It energized me in temperatures that hovered around 50°F. On the first mile or so, the Bright Angel Trail was sandy and followed the river. Eventually, the trail wound its way uphill inside a canyon. Slick ice greeted me at the top.
suspension bridge on the Bright Angel Trail
As I crossed the Colorado River, morning sunlight gave the canyon a golden glow.

The top of the Bright Angel Trail was a bit hazardous.
Overall, the hike was a phenomenal experience, but the time flew by too fast. It was a lot easier than I had expected. What I found challenging was balancing a writing deadline and an active vacation. With most jobs, you leave your work behind. I brought mine with me. The plane ride gave me a long stretch of time to get immersed in my work and accomplish enough to put my mind at ease. When I returned, I put aside the unpacking until my article was close to finished.

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